Drouin-Chartier JP, Gagnon J, Labonte ME, Desroches S, Charest A, Grenier G, Dodin S, Lemieux S, Couture P, Lamarche B. - 46184 N - Nutr J 2015 ; 14(1) : 12.

Impact of milk consumption on cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity

BACKGROUND: The impact of dairy intake on cardiometabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) needs further research.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of milk consumption on a wide array of cardiometabolic risk factors associated with MetS (blood lipids, cholesterol homeostasis, glucose homeostasis, systemic inflammation, blood pressure, endothelial function) in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity.
METHODS: In this randomized, crossover study, 27 women with abdominal obesity consumed two 6-week diets based on the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), one with 3.2 servings/d of 2% fat milk per 2000 kcal (MILK) and one without milk or other dairy (NCEP). The macronutrient composition of both diets was comparable (55% carbohydrates, 15% proteins, 30% fat and 10% saturated fat).
RESULTS: The MILK diet had no significant effect on LDL-C, triglycerides, LDL size, CRP and cell adhesion molecule concentrations and on indicators of insulin sensitivity. The MILK diet reduced HDL-C, adiponectin, endothelin and fasting glucose levels as well blood pressure (all P <= 0.01), but those changes were comparable to those seen with the NCEP milk-free diet (all between-diet P >= 0.07). Finally, the MILK diet was associated with lower VLDL apolipoprotein B fractional catabolic rate (-13.4%; P = 0.04) and plasma sterol concentrations (-12.0%; P = 0.04) compared with the control NCEP milk-free diet. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that short-term consumption of low fat milk in the context of a prudent NCEP diet has no favorable nor deleterious effect on cardiometabolic risk factors associated with MetS in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity.